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Updated: Jul 13

Adela Maddison (1862-1929)

mezzo-soprano Annie Rosen

pianist Eunmi Ko

In this colorful and inventive song, English composer Adela Maddison reveals her French influences, yet also offers a window into her own passionate and curious nature.


Maddison led an exciting, rather scandalous and complicated life. After marrying and having a family, she found herself as a composer. She championed the music of Gabriel Fauré, studied with him, became his lover, and left her family behind to follow him. Fauré cherished her as well, and found her musical talent and compositions inspired. She almost certainly had physical relationships with women as well, and later on in her life she returned to England to care for her husband when he fell ill.


Updated: Jul 12

Clara Faisst (1872-1948)

mezzo-soprano Thea Lobo

organist Sam Nelson


originally released June 18th, 2020

German composer Clara Faisst shows off her rich, late-romantic style as she passionately paints the scene in Morija, titled for the mountain Abraham climbs to sacrifice his son Isaac. You can hear their slow dark journey, Isaac’s sweet naïveté, Abraham’s Godly resolve, and their triumphant resolution.


Faisst received extensive and prestigious early musical training in Karlsruhe and Berlin, eventually becoming student and friend of composer Max Bruch. Upon graduating, she toured widely in Europe as a pianist, featuring her own compositions.



Updated: Jul 12

Ernest Hogan (1865-1909)

mezzo-soprano Thea Lobo

organist Sam Nelson


originally released June 18th, 2020

This guileless tune in popular style, written towards the end of Hogan's life, nods at the ubiquity of childhood nostalgia and familial love.


Ernest Hogan started performing in his teenage years on tour as a dancer, musician, and comedian with minstrel troupes. During the height of his career he enjoyed wide recognition and acclaim, but in his later years he admitted to a sense of shame in participating in and furthering racist tropes in music and entertainment. He was the first Black performer to produce and star in a Broadway show, The Oyster Man, in 1907. He continued to perform this show until his health failed him and he collapsed multiple times on stage, dying of tuberculosis in 1909